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Strange cukes????

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Stephie  Send Stephie a private message!


Posted on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 12:03 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Has anyone tried red cukes or white pickling cukes? Both are on ebay and I am wondering?????

Stephie
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Oldiebutgoodie  Send Oldiebutgoodie a private message!


Posted on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 12:20 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

I haven't tried either, Stephie, and I doubt that I will. I like my pickles to be green, to the extent that I sometimes add a tiny drop of food colouring.

I do grow Royal Burgundy beans, after having been assured that they turn green when cooked. It's a great way to get kids to eat their bean. I call them Grandma's magic beans and allow my grandkids to watch as I toss them into boiling water.

Oldiebutgoodie - Ontario, Zone "5b"
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Stephie  Send Stephie a private message!


Posted on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 03:30 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

I inherited my grandfather's gene for planting the "unusual" and often with great results. I tried pea-pods that were yellow last year and they were better than any pea pods I have tasted (I also quite often use veggies raw in salads for their colours too). Purple beans, red beans, striped beans, tomatoes in every colour,coloured carrots (purple and yellow are the very best),swiss chard that's almost neon coloured, beets (white are the sweetest), all manner of lettuces,and I extend this to fruits..pink and white currents (pink are sweetest), yellow, purple kiwis, yellow, black and red raspberries; colours can also mean different nutrional status...purple things are very good for you while the lighter versions less so...but ALL fruits and vegetables are great.....like to try different things to see if I like them. I remember discussing the white tomatoe with an older gentleman who wanted nothing to do with it...interestingly, he could no longer eat tomatoes because they were acidic but the white one would have given him the great tomatoe taste with a lot less acid....so, please don't be too "colour" prejudiced...you can miss alot of really good stuff...and kids would love coloured veggies, a good way to keep their interest!!!

Stephie
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Oldiebutgoodie  Send Oldiebutgoodie a private message!


Posted on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 04:50 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

You're right, Stephie. I'm often critical of people who don't try different foods, albeit not unusually coloured ones. I'll have to try some of the more exotic stuff. I do love the rainbow coloured chard. I put it into my flower beds for added colour.

Oldiebutgoodie - Ontario, Zone "5b"
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Stephie  Send Stephie a private message!


Posted on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 07:55 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

The other benefit is the "attention" and surprise people give when they see these things! Oh and strawberries? The little white alpines are extremely flavorful..much more than the red altho I grow both..and they like shade (at least partial but also do well in complete). I am extremely fond of coloured swiss chard too. And THEY look really great in salads (their stalks mostly) and in stir-fries. Geeze...now I'm hungry!

Stephie

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