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Pressure Cooking

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Durgan  Send Durgan a private message!




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Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 10:20 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Pressure Cooking
by Durgan on Fri Feb 22, 2008 6:07 pm

http://cahloo.notlong.com Here is pictures of my pressure cooker and colander insert.

Any cooking that minimizes the time, temperature, and water will help to preserve nutrients. Pressure cooking under steam is one of the methods best because it minimizes time and requires little water. http://hajeir.notlong.com There are far more benefits from Pressure cooking than deficits. It far surpasses all other methods of cooking. Practice makes perfect. http://missvickie.com/library/benefits.html A gourmet meal can be prepared within an hour, once one gets proficient.

Pressure cooker rings should last the life of the cooker. The lid should be run under water to wet the ring before putting in place. This lubricates slightly and prevents tearing.

The other action that ruins rings quickly is leaving the lid on the cooker loose with the heat on. The ring gets hot due to lack of conduction and dries out quickly. If it is desired to heat the material in the cooker, then use another lid.

How do I know, because I ruined a ring once, and determined the cause.

I have never had the small safety grommet damaged, but have lost it if the rocking pressure valve hole gets jammed, due to material plugging so a spare may be in order. Since then I have change my procedure as depicted following.

I have a colander exactly the same size as the pressure chamber and place the material to be cooked in this device, My material doesn't touch the water due to the base on the bottom of the colander. This means peas, rice, grains, oats, can be cooked without the bits of material jamming the rocking exhaust, thus preventing the safety valve from blowing.

The colander was a typical type and I knocked off the two handles with a sharp blow from a a hammer. This is easy since they are only spot welded in place.

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"
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Stephie  Send Stephie a private message!


Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 11:57 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

A lot of people are afraid of these because they think that they'll explode. They new ones don't, even if you forget they have safety valves to release steam automatically. I agree...they make great meals and canning is safe as long as you follow the rules exactly.

Stephie
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Seil  Send Seil a private message!



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Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 03:49 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

I couldn't live without my Presto pressure cooker. Well actually it was a wedding gift of my mom's in 1946. It still works like a charm and I can still get parts (gaskets and seals etc.) for it at my local ACE Hardware. We use it at least 3 or 4 times a week to cook something in.

Seil - Michigan, Zone "6"
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Calendula  Send Calendula a private message!




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Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 11:53 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Is a pressure cooker an Energy saver? And I always think that the food will over cook in them, especially the vegetables and potatoes? Am I wrong in that?

Calendula - Ontario, Zone "5b"
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Durgan  Send Durgan a private message!




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Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 02:16 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post


Calendula wrote on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 07:53 am:

And I always think that the food will over cook in them, especially the vegetables and potatoes? Am I wrong in that?



Do a few dry runs to determine the cooking time. Most vegetables depending upon the size are cooked almost the same time the pressure reaches 15 PSI (the usual pressure)when the cooker starts to sing.This only takes about two to four minutes at the most.

For example; I made a pot roast yesterday. Starting at 3PM. I cooked the meat alone for about 40 minutes. Then removed it. The vegetables in the colander for about 2 minutes cooking. Then I put the pot roast back and mixed the vegetables with the gravy and a little liquid that was present.The vegetables cooked were potatoes, carrots,parsnips,rutabago,green beans, garlic, green pepper, and onion.

The meal was served at 4 PM , and was almost perfect. One hour from start to finish.

It is easy to over-cook the vegetable, since we are talking about one to two minutes as opposed to 15 or 20 minutes boiling on the stove.

I can cook perfectly, but do admit it took a few attempts. I consider it well worth the effort to master this device.

The colander insert makes a huge difference particularly with items that will boil up and block the rocking exhaust device. The food in the colander doesn't touch the water directly, hence doesn't boil up. I designed this device after encountering blockage when cooking beans, rice, and peas and similar items.

Also, all vegetables can be cooked simultaneously in the colander. This is not possible or is more difficult when boiling in a pot at atmospheric pressure.

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"
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Durgan  Send Durgan a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 04:38 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post http://eghea.notlong.com

Hi

I followed and enjoyed your garden blog through the summer of 2007. Found your 2008 blog today. I am from India, where a kitchen is incomplete without a pressure cooker. We cook every thing in it. From rice and lentils to meats. You can use the pressure cooker to steam foods, if you take off the 'rocking exhaust' as you call it. We just call it the whistle. Because that's what it does. Also, if you want to heat something, put the lid on with the ring, but don't put the exhaust on. This method will work for both steaming things in your colander as well as heating.

I am surprised that vessels weren't included in your purchase. In India, when you buy a pressure cooker, it comes with three interlocking cylindrical steel vessels that fit into the cooker. As well as a perforated base, which is put on the bottom of the cooker to prevent the clogging you mentioned. Maybe I will post pictures of the assembled cooker on my blog and send you a link. I am sure you will be able to find similar pots around the house.

Also, I am sure you do this, but make sure to take off the exhaust before each time you cook and make sure the path for the steam is clear through.

To increase the life of the ring, you may want to remove it from the cooker, wet it and stretch it lightly before you operate the cooker.

Happy pressure cooking !

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"
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Sueanne  Send Sueanne a private message!


Posted on Thursday, June 05, 2008 - 11:52 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post


I enjoyed reading about the pressure cooker. Never thought of using the colander. Mine has legs which should keep the food out of the water. Meat in the pressure cook comes out so tender. Use a six quart which really holds alot and works better since it si stainless steel. Will have to share some recipes . _______
SueannePlant Forum
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Sueanne - Florida, Zone "9"
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Lovinlife  Send Lovinlife a private message!



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Posted on Friday, June 06, 2008 - 02:44 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

This is very interesting, James. I really enjoy your postings. Do you know if you can use the pressure cooker on a glasstop stove? I've posted this question in the Garden Recipes forum also.

Lovinlife - Utah, Zone "5"
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John_ny  Send John_ny a private message!



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Posted on Saturday, June 07, 2008 - 06:11 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

My wife uses it on the glass top stove all the time. She wouldn't be without it. Vegetables like peas, etc. come out so much nicer; bright green and tender, as opposed to gray-green, and mealy. Some time, after WW II, my mother had to put her name on a waiting list, at the store, to get one.

John_ny - NY, Zone "USDA Zone 7 Sunset Zone 34"

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