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Durgan  Send Durgan a private message!




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Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 01:01 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Chitting Potatoes

Chitting http://iuyum.notlong.com/

Seed tubers are best 'chitted' or sprouted. Unpack and lay the tubers out in a single layer in a tray with the 'rose' end uppermost. This end has the most eyes or buds and sprouts will arise from these. Some suppliers offer 'pre-chitted' seed. Placing in egg cartons is ideal, and simple.


http://heixa.notlong.com Chitting Picture.

Keep the trays of tubers in a cool but frost-free place with at least moderate light, such as in an unheated room. Direct sunlight is best avoided. Sprouts will form within a few weeks. The tuber is therefore ready to grow away as soon as planted. Tubers can be laid out to chit from January onwards, but planting should be delayed until March in sheltered and southern areas or April in less favoured districts. Earlier plantings can rot in the ground or the shoots can be frosted off on sharp nights. By this time the sprouts should be about 5cm (2in) long and dark coloured (green not insipid in appearance). Longer thinner sprouts are caused by excess heat or too little light or both, and tiny sprouts suggest conditions are too cold. Chitting takes about six weeks.
If the weather is unsuitable for planting, tubers can be left to chit further, even into May, without adverse effects.

Although unsprouted tubers can be planted, the chitted ones benefit from their flying start. Early cultivars will crop earlier and more heavily if chitted. You can help the process by rubbing off all but the four strongest sprouts so that the tuber's energy is diverted into a few really strong shoots that form new potatoes as early as possible. Second early and maincrop potatoes also benefit from chitting but they don't need thinning of sprouts. Chitting later cultivars results in earlier foliage before blight or drought strike and they mature earlier and can be gathered before slugs damage the tubers.

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"
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Oldiebutgoodie  Send Oldiebutgoodie a private message!


Posted on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 02:04 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

I have to tell you about a planting technique that works really well for me, James. For years I followed my grandfather's planting technique - making hills then hilling them up several times throughout the summer - a fairly time consuming effort.

Now I dig a trench as deep as I can (about 2 feet), plant my spuds, and mound the soil up as high as possible, tamping it as I go. This way I only have to pull the soil up once after the plants have grown. This technique has worked really well for me for the past five years, but we've had relatively hot summers. I wonder if the potatoes might have been delayed or even rotted if the soil had not warmed well.

Oldiebutgoodie - Ontario, Zone "5"
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Durgan  Send Durgan a private message!




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Posted on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 04:37 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Chitting Potatoes A little more detail.

Chitting http://iuyum.notlong.com/ General Overview.

Seed tubers are best 'chitted' or sprouted. Look closely at the potatoes and you should see more eyes at the crown - often there are three or four, sometimes five, in a cluster. On some tubers, particularly the roundish shaped types, they may be placed off centre. If these are allowed to grow they will produce mainly small tubers. Using a potato peeler or a small pointed knife remove all the eyes in the cluster by scooping approximately one eighth of an inch (3mm) deep, which should eliminate any regrowth. Without the crown cluster eyes, the tuber's food reserves will be directed to shoulder and side eyes. Reject all tubers showing the slightest sign of disease. Cutting out the diseased part, such as dry rot or gangrene, is no answer because if it is planted the diseased tubers will infect the soil.

Set treated tubers, crown up, on egg trays, thus allowing space for the sprouts to develop. They do not require high temperatures, but should be kept in full light and free from extreme cold or frost.This will encourage sturdy sprouts. Sprouts will form within a few weeks, dark blue or green, or deep pink or red, depending upon the cultivar, by planting time. By chitting we may select the eyes and encourage good sturdy sprouts before planting to produce earlier, improved crops.

http://heixa.notlong.com/ Chitting Picture, showing sprouts.

Although unsprouted tubers can be planted, the chitted ones benefit from their flying start, and vigorous sprouts. Early cultivars will crop sooner and more heavily if chitted.

Chitting later season cultivars results in earlier foliage before blight or drought strike and they mature earlier and can be gathered before slugs damage the tubers.

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"
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Posted on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 04:39 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Proposed Testing of Chitting.

I will test two rows of one type of potato this year. Using this procedure. I will plant the regular potatoes in the ground and the chitted potatoes at the same time, probably about the 15 of April 2008. My soil and location is ideal.

Chitting potatoes. I only learned about the procedure two years ago. I chitted but did not run any controls.

I have no interest in shortening the harvest time, but am interested in larger uniform size, and greater quantity. One row of 25 will be chitted and the other row of 25 will simply be placed in the ground. The rows will be a adjacent. These will be allowd to mature without taking any small early potatoes. The results should be informative.

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"
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Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2008 - 08:33 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

http://miezoh.notlong.com 16 March 2008 My Chitting method.

Seed potatoes were purchased 16 March 2008. Some were already sprouted, so it was easy to remove the clustered sprouts. This is my method. I use a potato peeler and remove a plug consisting of the clustered sprouts. This is probably only feasible in a home garden, due to the labour and expense involved.

The types of potatoes are Kennebec, Superior, Chiefton.

Durgan - Ontario, Zone "5B"

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