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Serenitybench  Send Serenitybench a private message!




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Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 04:38 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

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Inbetween the rain drops...Put in 9 garlic in the Iris bed for the Tomato God to watch over till July. (This lil piggy needs to stay home and take a bath)
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Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 06:07 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

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Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Charles  Send Charles a private message!




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Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 09:27 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

I am happy that you decided to get some in, Mimi! There is nothing like garden fresh garlic and stir-fries using their scape prior to harvest are fantastic. Here are a few pictures of my planted and straw protected cloves. This year, I planted three rows instead of two and, given that I reaped about 120 bulbs this summer, I should have about 180 next July.

My vampire free zone.






I am also trying out growing some exotic varieties in large pots.

Charles - Wisconsin, Zone "4b"
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Serenitybench  Send Serenitybench a private message!




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Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2006 - 09:44 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Mary,Mary how does your garlic grow? ??all in a row.!!
I forgot about the straw!!! we had so much rain today and it's still raining and blowing. I am not going to the barn now. Your garden is so neat and organized.

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Jak3  Send Jak3 a private message!




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Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 04:26 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

I have mine in now. I "borrow" leaves from my neighbour's seven acres to mulch mine. In this house we don't get leaves because of the wind direction - blows everything into the park! I planted "Music", a hard neck variety that stores well and produces large cloves. We have a fall garlic festival here as this is a big crop here. This is where I get my seed garlic. Last year I also planted Russian Red - smaller, red coloured, pretty potent!

Jak3 - Ontario, Zone "4/5"
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Charles  Send Charles a private message!




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Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:02 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Music is excellent and becoming quite popular here in the U.S., Julie. I ordered many different varieties this year and even took the trouble to keep them all straight in my garden. That should make cooking more interesting next year. My seed garlic came from http://thegarlicstore.com/index.cgi/hardneck.html.

I have to make it to a garlic festival sometime.

German Porcelain, whole bulbs, 1/2 lb bag, $9.95
This giant-cloved hardneck has delicate purple stripes on a white wrapper and the taste is as good as it looks. Grows well in colder climates. The plant produces lavish leaves and giant edible scapes. The plants have sometimes reached my chin, and I'm 6' 2".

Romanian Red - whole bulbs, 1/2 lb bag, $10.95
A long storing porcelain hardneck. The bulbs have large, easy to peel cloves. The taste is hot and pungent with a considerable bite. Speaking of bite, if you have vampire problems, this is the one for you.

Russian Giant - whole bulbs, 1/2 lb bag, $10.95
A porcelain hardneck that can get very, very big if it likes your soil. The plants are very tall, and the unfurled scapes can head towards five feet at times. The big bulb has six to eight giant, easy-to-peel cloves and has spiced up many a Cossack's dinner on the windy steppes.

Italian Purple - whole bulbs, 1/2 lb bag, $10.95
The basic Italian hardneck, also called Gambino and "Easy Peel." It produces large bulbs with easy to peel cloves that do wonders for Mediterranean cooking. Widely grown in the Ohio Valley and Northeast it makes its way into a lot of home-cooked Italian suppers.

Music - whole bulbs, 1/2 lb bag, $9.95
This porcelain hardneck is rapidly becoming one of the most popular of the new varieties. The bulbs can be rather large and the cloves have a beautiful pink skin. It is grown throughout the northern US where it is prized for its perky flavor.

Rare & Heirloom Sampler 8-Pack (all climate zones), one bulb of each, $24.95 These are some of the rarest and hardest to find varieties, only available in limited quantities…be the first one on your block to sport these outstanding alliums!

Ail de Pay Gers - from Bergiers in southern France; large white artichoke bulbs with a lusty flavor
Armenian Porcelain - from the Armenian village of Hadrut Karabagh; 5-7 large rose striped cloves
Bzenc - easier to grow than pronounce; a marble purple stripe of Czech origin; spicy raw
Pyong Vang Korean - Hot. Spicy. Zingy. Zesty. Punchy. Wow! You get the idea....this Asiatic is rare as it is hot!
Siciliano - in the old country, when Mama sent you out for garlic, you had better bring back this one!
French Germinador - luminous cream and violet skins; discovered in a farmer's market near Marseilles
Red Rezan - a glazed purple stripe from Russia; the flavor is rich but not overly hot
Leningrad - a porcelain producing very tall plants; big white bulbs, easy to peel. But maybe it should now be called St. Petersburg?

Exotic Hardnecks 6-Pack (all climate zones) 6 bulbs, $18.95

Marino - a hard to find rocomabole with a punchy flavor all its own
Stull - a porcelain with gold tinged wrappers and big, big cloves
Gautemalen Ikeda - from the village of Huehuetenango; this purple stripe will grow almost anywhere; the flavor is mild but distinctive
Korean Red-- large burgandy cloves. HOT! From the country that eats more garlic than any other. Did we say HOT!?
Rosewood - a porcelain with deep purple skins; big cloves, bigger taste
Morado Gigante - from Chile, the deep burgundy colored skins are as distinctive as the rich flavor

I am hoping that this will be enough.

Charles - Wisconsin, Zone "4b"
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Greg  Send Greg a private message!




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Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:25 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Looks great Charles. I have my order sitting here. Will till my garden up probably in a week or so.

Greg - ND, Zone "4"
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Suzyqt1968  Send Suzyqt1968 a private message!




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Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:38 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Vampires beware!!!! (And prospective dates!!) That is quite a variety Charles. I don't think I will be ordering any, but I do plan on picking some up at the local feed and seed. We still have time yet before needing to put it in. Our ground doesn't typically freeze hard except a couple of times a year.

By the way, who is that glassed man kidnapping George??? Oh wait...is that you Charles??!! hehe Cute pic

Suzyqt1968 - Washington, Zone "7-8"
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Serenitybench  Send Serenitybench a private message!




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Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:45 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Charles? Is that you?You keep changing.
WOW!had no idea there were all those kinds of garlic. I just used what ever it was I had on hand to plant. Next time I shall be better informed. Maybe we should have a garlic swap next harvest?
What ? is a normal, good garlic for general wop cooking and
?how do you keep it from getting dried out. Those garlic keepers work?

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 11:33 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

bet there is good garlic in these!Plant Forum

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Charles  Send Charles a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 04:33 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Thanks guys. Thankfully, dates love my garlic, Suzy.

It is a picture of Harry two years ago when he was a puppy with a bespectabled yours truly.

A swap sounds good, but might not work in practice. While you can even use garlic from the grocery store to grow it, people tend to get better results with seed garlic which you have to purchase. Add to that that some us like to grow organically. Though, I supposed we could all purchase different organic garlic and swap bulbs and/or cloves. This year is the first time that I am growing some garlic from my harvest, just to see how much it differs from seed. I will know next July.

I would like to try a large garlic keeper, but have not bought one yet. It is best to store them in a cool, dry and well-ventilated place in a well-ventilated container or mesh bags. Garlic can also be frozen and peeled cloves can be submerged in wine or vinegar and stored in the refrigerator. I have a couple of dozen large cloves in a pint-sized mason jar of Merlot. Avoid storing them in oil, given the risk of botulism.

That food looks good, Mimi.

Charles - Wisconsin, Zone "4b"
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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 06:08 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Charles? garlic Seed? I know nothing of garlic seed, I was taught by some old farming man to just use the cloves and stick them in the grown. you mean I have done it wrong. Blast!And I don't want any botulism. No kind of "Ism '
Storing garlic in Vinegar huh. What kind? if you please?

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Charles  Send Charles a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 06:51 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

You did not do anything wrong. Seed garlic refers to carefully selected bulbs and cloves.

http://www.garlic-central.com/growing/seed.html

"Seed Garlic

Whilst there have been some experiments in producing garlic "seeds", almost all garlic is grown from individual cloves. You can start growing garlic simply by taking the biggest, healthiest looking cloves from an ordinary bulb of garlic and planting them. So why, then, should we worry about seed garlic? Why should we pay money for garlic seed when we can start growing our own garlic without buying anything?

Why Buy Seed Garlic?

The answer is quality. Growing garlic from randomly selected cloves is a lottery. You can increase your chance of success by using the best cloves from the best bulbs. However even then there is always a chance of disappointing results.

One basic issue is that garlic is asexual. Because it is grown from cloves with no pollination, a bulb of garlic is effectively a clone of the head from which the seed garlic was taken.

This means that if the original bulb was prone to weaknesses then the seed garlic will also be prone to these weaknesses and so on through the generations. Commercial seed garlic is selected to avoid weak garlic wherever possible.

Another problem is disease. It is almost impossible to keep the average home garden clear from all the possible diseases, fungi, etc that can affect your crops. This means that - especially after a few years of cultivation - the chances are that your garlic has at least some minor infection. Obviously if you start growing garlic with an infected clove then the odds are stacked against you. Buying fresh, commercial seed garlic avoids this problem.

Finally, buying in seed garlic gives you the opportunity to try growing different varieties of garlic. Most shops stock only one or two varieties. If you use shop bought garlic as your seed stock, it is often difficult to be sure exactly what you are growing!

It is definitely possible to grow great garlic in the home garlic without spending money on commercial seed garlic. However if you have been diappointed with your results then perhaps a small investment in some garlic known to be healthy and without disease would be a good way to kick-start your gardening."

Just do not store it in oil, Mimi. That can lead to botulism.

Any vinegar would work, but I like wine better. Right now, most of my garlic is in a large bowl.

Charles - Wisconsin, Zone "4b"
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Serenitybench  Send Serenitybench a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 07:17 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

OOOOOooooo.
huh
Well, at this point I will just be glad if it did not get washed away today. Just was outside and I now have a river in my yard, next to my babbling brooke, which is maybe 3 feet from my bench area I worked so very hard on all SpringSummerFall.
have to go back and read tht site. Thanks for taking the time to post that useful information. As usual,Charles, you always give us all quite an education. Much appreciated.!!

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 08:24 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

so, the BIG Question is
Do we smash????
Or use a garlic press.
Personally, I have always pressed. (with my $14 pampered chef press I got talked into buying)
Whats everyone else do?

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Greth  Send Greth a private message!


Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 08:25 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

You are getting a lot of converts here Charles!

Greth - South Australia, Zone "?"
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Cmmwiebe  Send Cmmwiebe a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 09:51 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Really like the beds Charles!

Clayton

Cmmwiebe - Saskatchewan, Zone "3a"
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Charles  Send Charles a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 11:16 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Sometimes, I will crush it with the flat side of a blade to easily remove the skin and then leave it as is or dice it. Most of the time, I use an overpriced Cutco press that someone gave me as a gift, replacing my cheap, but effective aluminum one.

http://www.cutco.com/jsp/catalog/detail.jsp?ensembleId=10534&categoryId=70
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Converts are cool, Margaret, and thanks, Clayton.

Charles - Wisconsin, Zone "4b"
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Serenitybench  Send Serenitybench a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 11:35 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Oh my! I would be too ashamed to post the photo of MY press, I do think mine is Aluminum, but it works. Maybe I shall try to give it a wack with my new Anolon badboy !

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Charles  Send Charles a private message!




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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 11:47 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

The aluminum ones are fine. I would probably still be using mine had it not been for the gift.

Charles - Wisconsin, Zone "4b"
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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 11:55 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

Say it like the Brits do.
Al -you -minny-um
or how ever it is they say it. Love it.

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"
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Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 02:22 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosCopy highlighted text to new message Print Post

My garlic is up! About 4 inches tall.

Serenitybench - PaOhio, Zone "5a"

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