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I hope he's not poisonous... (pics)

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Duckwatcher  Send Duckwatcher a private message!




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Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 08:39 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

I found this gal she was about the size of half dollar and since she has that egg sack I hope she's not poisonous.

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This guy is most definitely not poisonous and I hope he sticks around, when I redid my garden I did tear up part of his territory. I put a clay pot partially into the ground as a little toad house, he still has the begonia's tho :).

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Duck Watcher, N. California, Z9b
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Cherylb  Send Cherylb a private message!


Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 09:02 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

What a scary looking spider and what a cute little frog!

Nice photos!

Cherylb Oklahoma Zone 6
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Susanq  Send Susanq a private message!

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Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 10:34 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

I'd much rather look at the frog!

SusanQ - Zone 4b-5b Wisconsin
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1birdylady  Send 1birdylady a private message!




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Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 02:28 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Oh how I hate spiders. Shiver Shiver!!! Love to see them at a distance only. Some are very beautiful.

1birdylady Mississippi Gulf Coast Zone 8b
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Kniphofia  Send Kniphofia a private message!

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Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 05:04 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

DW check out my post, I have the same spider. They're called wolf spiders. How wonderful to see her with her egg case! They aren't poisonous but obviously can bite.

What an adorably fat frog!}

Sue Central Maine z4
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Deanneart  Send Deanneart a private message!




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Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 08:10 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Oh my goodness, those pics are an arachnaphobe's nightmare. (me being one) I take a live and let live attitude with the eight legged ones in the garden but they simply are not allowed in the house, and those wolf spiders think it is a great idea to spend the winters in the house. Every year when the days get colder I have to evict them from my living space. Shiver, is right!

Deanne New Hampshire Zone 5
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Duckwatcher  Send Duckwatcher a private message!




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Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 10:55 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Deanne,

I am not so kind when they are in my house, they get the ole vacuum cleaner treatment. This gal was out on my patio so I let her be after I got a few pics.

Sue,
*shew* I thought it was a wolf spider but I wasn't sure :), thanks for the ID

Some info on Wolf Spiders:
Characteristics –
Size: Wolf spiders come in many sizes with a body size ranging from 1/4-inch to more than one and a half inches in length. The largest species may have a leg measuring up to three inches or more leading many homeowners to mistake them for tarantulas.

Color: Most wolf spiders are brown although some may appear black.

These spiders are usually quite hairy.


Behavior – Wolf spiders are active hunters which search for prey during the day or night, depending on the species. These common spiders may live in significant numbers around homes and other buildings, especially those structures which have lush landscaping. Wolf spiders enter underneath doors or through cracks in the exterior walls. Wolf spiders are unique in that they carry their egg sacs from the tip of their abdomens attached to the spinnerets. The young spiderlings also ride on the mother’s back for a few days after hatching. Bites involving wolf spiders are rare and are not dangerous.

Habitat – Outdoors, wolf spiders occupy a wide variety of habitats, usually at ground level. They will be common in heavy ground covers, such as ivy or monkey grass, and can be found beneath stones and other items, as well as within cracks between landscape timbers. They do not breed in homes, and usually only one to a few will be seen inside.

Duck Watcher, N. California, Z9b
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Galanthophile  Send Galanthophile a private message!




Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 12:52 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Love the frog/toad - have respect for the spider!

Ann UK
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Janet43945  Send Janet43945 a private message!




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Posted on Friday, September 12, 2003 - 02:17 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Like the spiders in the garden,never on me,give me the willies.Great picture of this one.Give me a frog anyday.Upload

JANET OHIO zone 5