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Can I Move my Clematis in the Spring ? ?

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Greg  Send Greg a private message!




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Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 10:29 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Hello oh knowledgable clematis folks . . .

Some of you may recall that I just put in a new small garden bed last June including two clematis. Here's a picture from then . .



Well, as it turns out, this coming spring, that deck will be torn off and a new addition to our kitchen and entrance is going to be built. The new stairway and landing will be right where this garden is. So, if I am to save my poor integrifolia durandii, I will need to dig them up first thing in the spring, probably before they even begin to wake up. Do you think this will hurt them at all? Any issues I should be aware of?

Thanks a bunch!

Greg, ND Zone 4 Click to hear a voice greeting from Greg
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Gardenbug  Send Gardenbug a private message!




Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 10:39 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

I think you will be fine Greg as long as you dig a BIG clump of earth with them as soon as the soil is unfrozen. Try not to disturb the roots at all. Perhaps they won't even know they've been moved if you are able to do this. They will still be dormant then with any luck. It would be a good time to add bone meal and compost to the bottom of the hole.
You might decide now where you want them to be planted...far from construction work. You could even dig the holes now, in preparation for the event, to save yourself the trouble in Spring when things just may be chaos.

Gardenbug Ontario zone 4b/5b
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Spider  Send Spider a private message!




Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 10:44 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Must admit, I've never actually cut through a block of frozen soil to transplant a clematis but I've moved them at every other time of the year and never come across any serious problems, especially when they are relatively young. I'm just about to contemplate moving an 'Elvan' which has been there for about 5 years so the roots are probably at least 3' down - I'll just tell the plant it's a root-prune. I might be a bit more careful about moving more delicately-rooted types, like alpinas and macs but, in my experience, they soon recover. And when you move the durandii, have a good look for well-rooted shoots - you may find you can split off another plant or two.

Spider - North Lincolnshire,
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Suzymac  Send Suzymac a private message!




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Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 11:24 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

I've moved many a clematis in the spring and find that as long as you do it in EARLY spring, your clematis will be fine. Gardenbug was 'right on' when she said, "get as big a clump as possible".
I cut a deep, wide, circle around mine, then try to lift the root ball without any damage. I've done this when there were brand new 1" shoots emerging, but I wouldn't wait until any leaves form. If a clematis "knows" it has been moved it will slow down, so I try to fool my plants into never knowing they were touched.
Congrats on the new addition ! You'll have to post a finished photo.
Suzy

Suzymac - Massachusetts, Zone "6-7"
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Scilla  Send Scilla a private message!




Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 01:36 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

All the above was great advice, yet I've had success when the circumstances were horrid, such as having to actually cut the clematis roots from other roots in hot, mid-summer. I truly don't like to disturb the roots, but when it means life or suffocation death, do it anyway and the clematis have always survived. I expect they simply appreciate the life-saving effort, so that is why they grow fine after that trauma.

Scilla - Washington State, Zone "5"
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Greg  Send Greg a private message!




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Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 07:07 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Thanks for all your advice. I would dig them up now, but the ground is already frozen hard *sigh*. These plants were quite small and were planted in the second half of June from gallon pots. How deep do you think the roots might have grown in 3+ months or so? Also, I would like to plant them outside of the new addition after it is finished. Think they would be ok in pots for a few months?

Greg, ND Zone 4 Click to hear a voice greeting from Greg
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Spider  Send Spider a private message!




Posted on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - 07:04 am EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

Integrifolias - along with many other clematis - are a lot tougher than people think. I wouldn't like to speculate as to what the roots are like because that will depend on so many factors. But let's face it, if you dig them up they've got two chances, if you leave them, they'll be buried forever... and you can always buy (or beg) another!
I have a lot (more than 100) of my clems in pots, more or less permanently - we don't generally need much winter protection here - you probably would!

Spider - North Lincolnshire, Zone "UK"
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Karalyn  Send Karalyn a private message!




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Posted on Sunday, November 23, 2003 - 01:27 pm EST :   Last Buddysize PhotosPrint Post

I have the same question.

I have a LFH planed right next to my pine tree. I just don't think it is thriving there.

I think it has to share water with the pine tree trunk and is not winning.

I also had Mrs N. Thompson by the other pine tree and I don't even see a sign of her.

Our ground here is still workable and will be in the 40's next week. Should I move these now or wait?

I'm thinking I need to move my variegated Virginia Creeper too. It isn't as tough as the green ones, which readily grow everywhere they can get some water. But I like them, they grow up my pine tree branches and look really neat.

That was my hope for the clematis, but it just doesn't seem to be doing very well competing.

Some of you have moved them at any time and some are saying to be careful. So do you recommend the same that I would be okay transplanted it now?

Karalyn Idaho Zone 6

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