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  1. #13

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    To be honest, I find it impossible to dig out the plants of wild nature. No matter what kind of plants. It seems to be a cultural question: some people think they belong to everything and they can take what they want.
    Here in our region there are, for example, rare carnivorous plants in the bog. Luckily, it is very difficult to get there. And honestly, never would I ever have had the idea to carry these plants from there into my garden! I never had such ideas.
    Other people are doing it. I find it unacceptable.

    I do not really understand it. It is also forbidden to export / import certain animals or skins or bones or mussels or other collectors across borders.
    Why can people simply pick plants from nature?
    This makes me angry.
    Last edited by marylou; 02-28-2017 at 04:51 AM.

  2. #14

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    I believe if you take something from nature here you have to pay as much as steeling in a shop even more I believe in some woods it is not allowed t let run the dogs where they want. Gatherering blue berries in the wood you need a card,
    Last edited by Roelie; 02-28-2017 at 10:21 AM.

  3. #15

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wellington
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    I am appalled and saddened that wild double stocks are being removed with no controls in place to maintain the bio diversity of the Balkan populations. I wonder if the plants are declared at exit.

  4. #16

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    roellie, thatīs european law, the balkans do not yet belong to the european community.
    as from the local farmers hellebores are mostly regarded as weeds so there isnīt much conscience about the preciousness of these plants especially doubles. but scientists and biologists have started working. i guess that at some places the doubles are extinct. tom mitchell with his last seed offer offered seeds from the place where elizabeth strangman found the first doubles. he said that he didnīt find any doubles anymore, but he believed that the genes should still be there. the seeds were imediately sold out to japan. couldnīt get any.
    as those countries still have more existential problems than plants the hellebores donīt belong to the cites plants and donīt need any papers for export.
    will mc luhin didnīt do a good thing with his guided tours to all these special places and make them known.
    there is still some hope for some colonies where the landmines rested for a long time.

  5. #17

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wellington
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    It is unfortunate that those living in or at sites do have the view that hellebores are a weed, oh to be in that situation. I wonder if the locals are aware of the prices their weeds are getting in Japan?

  6. #18

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    i donīt think so.


    edit: the more i get to know about hellebore world the more i see the ugly part of it. be it the digging up of plants, be it big business with tc plants, be it those dutch greenhouses with 50000 hellebores. i understand that statement of tim muphy that he was glad to leave hellebore world.
    Last edited by lubuli; 02-28-2017 at 01:13 PM.

  7. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wellington
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    I have absolutely no disagreement with you when it comes to TC of HXH that can be seed raised. I am guilty of purchasing Anna's Red and Penny's Pink but beyond that I dark a line.

  8. #20

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    i hope rodney davis did make a good contract with the tc growers. the foliage is wonderful but i mistrust the winterhardiness of plants containing lividus blood. my ericsmithii died too. sometimes we do have really harsh winters though not as long as bruce has. mike byford told that these plants which he had in an one side open foliage tunnel are all dead. and we didnīt have an extremely cold winter.

    just saw a beautiful well shaped veined species double called montenegro queen 2. i really donīt know if i shall be glad to have seen a picture of that plant or shall i vomit, very confused feelings.

  9. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff View Post
    So an argument to collect wild seed could be proposed on these grounds. There still a huge amount of hellebore species assignment and diversification studies to be done, hopefully before wild populations disappear to extinction.
    That would be terribly sad.

  10. #22

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    1,352

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    The Davey marbled series may have been developed by crossing a fertile ericsmitthi with hybridus there are now a number of these in circulation with varying flower colours.
    It seems that the cold hardiness does not follow the hybridus parent.
    I grow my plants in full sun and for me leaf urn at this time of year is the issue. However I do not get winter snow on heavy frosts.
    I recall seeing an interview with Rodney in which he did say that TC royalties would no make him rich man.

  11. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff View Post
    I recall seeing an interview with Rodney in which he did say that TC royalties would no make him rich man.
    thatīs it. all the others earn the money, not the breeder.
    snow is not dangerous, itīs a protection, heavy frosts without snow are.

    and ericsmithii is not fertile, only may be the pollen.
    Last edited by lubuli; 02-28-2017 at 06:41 PM.

  12. #24

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    I wish TM stayed but I do understand. It is good enough to have Tim as a friend. The people of the Baltics control the situation. Until it becomes unacceptable things will remain the same. The hellebore will rebound. The alarming part is the lack of respect on all parts for the natural world. Look but do not touch. I live in a land of trilliums and hardy orchids. People still collect these, but not in a large way.
    There is a demand for nursery grown species from carefully pollinated genuine species. This would be very easy in a greenhouse in the winter. In the north you can force flower and hybridize in an insect free environment.
    In the garden you have to protect the bloom from insects or immaculate and protect the stigma. It would seem protecting the flower or whole plant would be best. The problem often over looked is pollen contamination. Once the insects become active pollen can be contaminated very easy. Protecting the stigma should be easy. It will be receptive before the pollen is ripe. A good clean uncontaminated pollen source must be a priority. The document states that hellebore pollen has short life. At room temps you need fresh pollen. Storing pollen frozen works but it is a pain.

    You have to ripen the pollen inside it would seem?

    TC? I grow and propagate hardy garden plants. I have tried these. Some will do well most will not thrive others are not hardy at all. Do not dwell in the present but look to the future. I hybridize what others are not. Its time to move on into something new. NO NO not a different genera! A new hybrid to play around with. I have two things to move forward and a focus on species production.
    Hope my hellebore survive the winter! Got big plans for them!
    60F yesterday, will be below freezing all weekend. last March it was brutal.
    Last edited by bruce03451; 03-01-2017 at 05:43 AM.

 

 
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