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Thread: Epiphyllum

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tigullio's Gulf
    Posts
    301

    Default Epiphyllum

    Red red red........


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,644

    Default

    I like that and I have just the place for it :)

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tigullio's Gulf
    Posts
    301

    Default

    If you have a Phoenix canariensis palm in your garden, the fibrous envelope at the base of the long leaves is a perfect substrate to grow Epiphyllums of any kind. Just insert there segments and forget them, they will sprout and grow easily as it is shown in this old pic.

    Last edited by kiwoncello; 05-24-2011 at 10:12 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    It's like a beautiful red fountain, Andre, and the white white ones are lovely too!

  5. #5

    Default

    That red epiphyllum is a beaut. It has so many red blossoms it's unbelievable. I have 2 plants - one plant that hasn't bloomed yet and the other that does bloom. I get all excited when I have maybe 3 or 4 blossoms.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    CA, S.F. Bay Area
    Posts
    3,992

    Default

    Wow! I have one similar to that red one, but it has never gotten that big, nor had more than a couple of flowers on it at a time. (I know I don't fertilize it enough -- I guess it's time I started!) It's nice to see the possibilities it has. How often and how long does yours bloom?

    I assumed it wouldn't want to be in direct sunlight, but from your picture, it looks like it can handle sun. How much sun or shade would you say it should get in a hot-summer climate? And what kind of soil does it like?

  7. #7

    Default

    Plant epiphyllums in a fast-draining soil mix, such as one used for orchids. Epiphyllums, like orchids, are epiphytes, meaning they grow naturally above ground in the moss, mold and soil collected in the forked branches of trees. They have a vining habit, with a tangled mass of roots and stems that holds the plant in place on the tree branch. Epiphyllums bloom better when slightly rootbound, so keep them in small pots. Add a trellis or stake to support the vining growth. They also do well in hanging baskets, where they can droop over the side. Give epiphyllums bright, indirect light or filtered sunlight. A bright north or east window is good. Outdoors, they like being hung in trees, where they can get dappled sunlight. Water thoroughly, until water runs out the drainage holes of the pot, and then don't water again until the top third of the soil in the pot is dry. Check every few days. Epiphyllums need moisture but will rot if they sit in wet soil. Be careful not to overwater.

    Fertilize epiphyllums from spring through fall with a balanced fertilizer, such as 6-6-6 or 8-8-8. Do not go higher than 10-10-10, or dilute a stronger fertilizer to bring it down to these levels. Do not fertilize at all in winter, when the plant is resting. Too little fertilizer is better than too much.

  8. #8

    Default

    Jean2

    You obviously are very knowledgeable regarding epiphyllums. Would you have any pictures to post? I think the blooms on these flowers are some of the most lovely I have ever seen and can't ever see enough pics of them. If you have pics could you please post some?
    It would be much appreciated in the time of this winter white.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you Tigerpaws. As per your request I have posted some of the epiphyllums here for you. :)



    EPi-1



    Epi-2


    Epi3


  10. #10

    Default

    Absolutely gorgeous blossoms!

    Thanks Jean2 for providing me with an epi "fix". That will keep me going for a while. :)

 

 

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